• Mount Stuart: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Mount Stuart: A Closer Look". Topics include the granite of Mount Stuart, Washington's Exotic Terranes, and the Baja-BC controversy regarding the origin of Mount Stuart. Record on October 13, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 115 folks attended the lecture.

    published: 07 May 2013
  • Mount Rainier: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Mount Rainier Geology". Topics include the Washington's plate tectonic history, Cascade Range history, and a current inventory of Rainier's volcanic deposits. Record on November 3, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 133 folks attended the lecture.

    published: 03 May 2013
  • Ellensburg Blue Agates: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    Central Washington University professor Nick Zentner discusses the formation of Ellensburg blue agates and how they were transported to the Kittitas Valley. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. May 15, 2013.

    published: 15 Aug 2013
  • Kittitas Valley Geology: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Kittitas Valley Geology". Topics include local bedrock layers exposed in central Washington, the Yakima Fold Belt, and recent Ellensburg Formation deposits in Kittitas Valley. Record on November 17, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 157 folks attended the lecture.

    published: 07 May 2013
  • Gingko Petrified Forest: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    Central Washington University professor Nick Zentner discusses the petrified wood of central Washington. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. May 22, 2013.

    published: 27 Sep 2013
  • Slow Earthquakes: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Slow Earthquakes: A Trigger?". Topics include Cascadia's great earthquakes and slow earthquakes (ETS events) monitored by GPS stations throughout CWU's PANGA network. Record on October 20, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 130 folks attended the lecture.

    published: 02 May 2013
  • Tsunami In Our Future: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Tsunami In Our Future". Topics include Brian Atwater's coastal evidence for the January 26, 1700 great earthquake and Chris Goldfinger's turbidite evidence in Cascadia's submarine canyons offshore. Record on October 20, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 109 folks attended the lecture.

    published: 02 May 2013
  • Wenatchee Ice Age Floods: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Wenatchee: Ice Age Floods". Topics include the bedrock of the Wenatchee area, and evidence for Ice Age floodwater that crept up the Wenatchee River Valley as far as Leavenworth. Record on June 5, 2013 at Ellensburg City Library's Hal Holmes Center in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 205 folks attended the lecture.

    published: 02 Oct 2013
  • Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "TWO ANCIENT PHILOSOPHERS ON WHY DEATH IS NO EVIL"

    What happens to us after we die? The ancient philosopher Plato claims that our soul is immortal and after death, undergoes reward or punishment, followed by reincarnation. Another ancient philosopher, Epicurus, argues that our soul disperses at death, extinguishing our consciousness. Yet neither philosopher thinks that death is to be feared, and both argue that understanding death gives us reason to live a philosophical life in the present. Philosophy professor Rachana Kamtekar explains how Plato and Epicurus came to such similar conclusions from very different starting points and explores the relevance of their views for us today.

    published: 06 Nov 2015
  • Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "LOVE AND DEATH IN THE STONE AGE"

    When we die, we live on as a persistent presence in the minds and memories of our loved ones.  Loved ones left behind have many ways of maintaining connections with their deceased, most notably marked burials in quiet places where the living are likely to return and visit.  Humans are the only kind of animal that buries their deceased loved ones and, as it happens, this gesture is preserved in some ancient archaeological sites. The emergence of burial traditions in the Stone Age implies that certain pre-modern humans (the Neanderthals) had already begun to care for the person as a unique, irreplaceable individual. In this lecture, Professor Stiner explores the origins of this essential human development, which likely represents the first cognitive bridge between the living and the deceased...

    published: 23 Oct 2015
  • Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "THE ELUSIVE SELF IN LIFE AND DEATH"

    Professor Shaun Nichols and his research team spent months exploring attitudes towards death among Hindus and Tibetan Buddhists in India. His exploration was prompted by the philosophical argument that we should not fear the idea of death because there is no enduring self that remains exactly the same even during biological life. At most we (our selves) are a collection of values, convictions, and memories undergoing constant change. From this perspective, the future “you" who dies will not be the same person as “you" today. Because Tibetan Buddhists embrace the concept that there is no enduring self throughout biological life, they should be less afraid of death at the end of biological life. But are they? His findings may surprise you.

    published: 12 Nov 2015
  • Downtown Lecture: Scott Anderson, November 4, 2015

    The Art All Around Us: Illustration and Visual Culture in AmericaScott Anderson, associate professor of art at Westmont, reveals the collective impact of illustration on our culture.

    published: 13 Nov 2015
  • Yakima River Canyon: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Yakima River Canyon". Topics include river meander development, formation of the Yakima River Canyon, and the 1998 debris flows in the canyon. Record on May 29, 2013 at Ellensburg City Library's Hal Holmes Center in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 241 folks attended the lecture.

    published: 30 Sep 2013
  • Downtown Lecture Series preview

    J. Edward Wright will speak about "The Histories and Mysteries of Heaven" in the first lecture of the series on immortality. Video courtesy of the University of Arizona College of Behavioral Sciences.

    published: 07 Oct 2015
  • Downtown Lecture Series: The Histories and Mysteries of Heaven

    Many people imagine heaven as a spectacularly beautiful place somewhere “up there” where God resides and where loved ones are finally and eternally united. How did the hope for a blessed afterlife arise and evolve in Western religions? Why did the hope for a heavenly afterlife become so powerful? And what do our images of the afterlife reveal about our deepest fears and highest hopes as humans today? In this lecture, Professor Wright will address these and other questions related to the power of afterlife beliefs and images of heaven. He will also explore possibilities for future images of the afterlife in light of recent advances in technology and modern science.

    published: 16 Oct 2015
  • Downtown Immorality Lecture Series: "THE DARK IMMORTALITY OF THE VAMPIRE"

    In time for Halloween, Professor Hogle will explore the surprising evolution of the vampire as an immortal being and why it has has become increasingly popular as both a desirable and an ominous figure.  For centuries, the mythic figure of the vampire embodied an evil immortality, bent on sucking life-blood from the living. Incorporated into 19th century Gothic fiction, this figure became symbolic of social and psychological evils, such as (sadly) the threat to "white purity" from the blood of other races, the depravity of the old-world aristocracy (as in Count Dracula), or the feared aggressiveness and greater independence of "liberated" women. But towards the end of the 20th century, the vampire-figure started to become "good" in some fictions and films. What does this recent change say ...

    published: 29 Oct 2015
  • Wenatchee Ice Age Floods: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Wenatchee: Ice Age Floods. Topics include the bedrock of the Wenatchee area, and evidence for Ice Age floodwater that crept up the Wenatchee River Valley. CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Floods of Lava and Water. Topics include the Washingtons Columbia River Basalts (Lava) and Ice Age Floods (Water). CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Wenatchee. Nick Zentner, geologist at Central Washington University, describes the connection between the Ice Age Floods and agriculture (e.g. soil types and structure) as we know it today in eastern.

    published: 24 Mar 2018
  • Discover SWUFE 2013, day 5 - lecture, Chengdu, cooking lesson, downtown

    video 07

    published: 23 Jul 2013
  • Downtown Lecture Series: Edible Roman Empire

    What lessons can we learn about food and foodways from the Roman Empire? A surprising amount. The Roman Empire encompassed some 50-60 million people, transforming the lives of its conquered populations. Wheat, olive oil, wine, and fish paste were mass-produced and transported thousands of miles, undercutting local food traditions. Agribusiness and monoculture supplanted independent farmers. Crops were harvested unsustainably. But at the same time many people benefited from greater food security than ever before. Who were the winners and losers in this, the first globalized food system?

    published: 06 Nov 2014
  • Mount Rainier: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

    Part of the Geology Lecture Series presented on March 5, 2011. Dr. Carolyn L. Driedger Hydrologist/Outreach Coordinator United States Geology Survey, . CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Mount Rainier Geology. Topics include the Washingtons plate tectonic history, Cascade Range history, and a current . View more from our digital library: Like us on Facebook: Follow us on Twitter: . CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Tsunami In Our Future. Topics include Brian Atwaters coastal evidence for the January 26, 1700 great earthquake and .

    published: 21 Aug 2017
  • Downtown Lecture Series: Rachana Kamtekar

    Rachana Kamtekar, Associate Professor of Philosophy, talks about leaving a legacy. She will speak about "Two Ancient Philosophers on Why Death is No Evil" at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4, as part of the Downtown Lecture Series on immortality. Video courtesy of the College of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arizona.

    published: 02 Nov 2015
  • Westmont Downtown Lecture: Jane Wilson

    Flourishing as Human Beings: The Impact of Practicing Gratitude Jane Wilson, Associate Professor of Education February 22, 2018, 5:30 p.m. University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara St. Even though gratitude is a central pillar of most religions and has been discussed in fields of sociology, ethics, and philosophy for centuries, only recently has it been scientifically studied. A growing body of social science research reveals that gratitude has the power to heal, energize and transform lives. People who consistently engage in practicing gratitude experience a boost in their overall well-being. Daily expressions of gratitude can enhance a person psychologically, socially, spiritually, physically and cognitively. Professor Wilson will summarize the research and identify key practices of gratitud...

    published: 27 Mar 2018
  • Westmont Downtown Lecture: Martin Asher

    What Will the Fed Do Next? What’s Ahead for the U.S. Economy Martin Asher, Professor of Economics and Business October 12, 2017, 5:30 p.m. University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara St. We are living in historic times. By public measures, the economy is fully employed, and inflation and interest rates remain rela-tively low. What interplay will occur between fiscal policy and monetary policy in 2017 and beyond? Though Congress has yet to formulate its plans on many critical issues, considerable discussion has occurred there and from the administration regarding fiscal policy proposals in the areas of business tax cuts, personal tax cuts and spending on infrastructure. Depending on what is ultimately enacted, how might the Federal Reserve respond? What will likely happen to the macroeconomy, th...

    published: 18 Oct 2017
  • Downtown Lecture: Andrea Gurney, October 8, 2015

    "Wired for Love: The Importance of Early Attachment" Are early relational experiences really that important to the development of a person? Do the bonds we form in childhood make a difference in later intimate relationships such as our marriages? Beginning with animal studies conducted in the 1950s, Gurney presents classic and revolutionary research in the field of attachment and child development and discuss the development of children’s Internal Working Model (IWM). As a practicing clinical psychologist, Gurney will discusses the four different attachment styles and the ways they affect relationships in childhood and adulthood. She also considers the impact of parenting practices on the emotional world of children.

    published: 15 Oct 2015
developed with YouTube
Mount Stuart:  Downtown Geology Lecture Series
58:53

Mount Stuart: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 58:53
  • Updated: 07 May 2013
  • views: 15667
videos
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Mount Stuart: A Closer Look". Topics include the granite of Mount Stuart, Washington's Exotic Terranes, and the Baja-BC controversy regarding the origin of Mount Stuart. Record on October 13, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 115 folks attended the lecture.
https://wn.com/Mount_Stuart_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Mount Rainier: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
1:05:22

Mount Rainier: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:05:22
  • Updated: 03 May 2013
  • views: 25898
videos
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Mount Rainier Geology". Topics include the Washington's plate tectonic history, Cascade Range history, and a current inventory of Rainier's volcanic deposits. Record on November 3, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 133 folks attended the lecture.
https://wn.com/Mount_Rainier_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Ellensburg Blue Agates: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
50:05

Ellensburg Blue Agates: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 50:05
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2013
  • views: 44588
videos
Central Washington University professor Nick Zentner discusses the formation of Ellensburg blue agates and how they were transported to the Kittitas Valley. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. May 15, 2013.
https://wn.com/Ellensburg_Blue_Agates_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Kittitas Valley Geology: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
1:11:26

Kittitas Valley Geology: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:11:26
  • Updated: 07 May 2013
  • views: 9358
videos
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Kittitas Valley Geology". Topics include local bedrock layers exposed in central Washington, the Yakima Fold Belt, and recent Ellensburg Formation deposits in Kittitas Valley. Record on November 17, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 157 folks attended the lecture.
https://wn.com/Kittitas_Valley_Geology_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Gingko Petrified Forest: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
50:21

Gingko Petrified Forest: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 50:21
  • Updated: 27 Sep 2013
  • views: 20395
videos
Central Washington University professor Nick Zentner discusses the petrified wood of central Washington. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. May 22, 2013.
https://wn.com/Gingko_Petrified_Forest_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Slow Earthquakes:  Downtown Geology Lecture Series
1:02:58

Slow Earthquakes: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:02:58
  • Updated: 02 May 2013
  • views: 14624
videos
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Slow Earthquakes: A Trigger?". Topics include Cascadia's great earthquakes and slow earthquakes (ETS events) monitored by GPS stations throughout CWU's PANGA network. Record on October 20, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 130 folks attended the lecture.
https://wn.com/Slow_Earthquakes_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Tsunami In Our Future: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
59:10

Tsunami In Our Future: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 59:10
  • Updated: 02 May 2013
  • views: 7775
videos
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Tsunami In Our Future". Topics include Brian Atwater's coastal evidence for the January 26, 1700 great earthquake and Chris Goldfinger's turbidite evidence in Cascadia's submarine canyons offshore. Record on October 20, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 109 folks attended the lecture.
https://wn.com/Tsunami_In_Our_Future_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Wenatchee Ice Age Floods: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
43:25

Wenatchee Ice Age Floods: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 43:25
  • Updated: 02 Oct 2013
  • views: 16553
videos
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Wenatchee: Ice Age Floods". Topics include the bedrock of the Wenatchee area, and evidence for Ice Age floodwater that crept up the Wenatchee River Valley as far as Leavenworth. Record on June 5, 2013 at Ellensburg City Library's Hal Holmes Center in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 205 folks attended the lecture.
https://wn.com/Wenatchee_Ice_Age_Floods_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "TWO ANCIENT PHILOSOPHERS ON WHY DEATH IS NO EVIL"
54:19

Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "TWO ANCIENT PHILOSOPHERS ON WHY DEATH IS NO EVIL"

  • Order:
  • Duration: 54:19
  • Updated: 06 Nov 2015
  • views: 713
videos
What happens to us after we die? The ancient philosopher Plato claims that our soul is immortal and after death, undergoes reward or punishment, followed by reincarnation. Another ancient philosopher, Epicurus, argues that our soul disperses at death, extinguishing our consciousness. Yet neither philosopher thinks that death is to be feared, and both argue that understanding death gives us reason to live a philosophical life in the present. Philosophy professor Rachana Kamtekar explains how Plato and Epicurus came to such similar conclusions from very different starting points and explores the relevance of their views for us today.
https://wn.com/Downtown_Immortality_Lecture_Series_Two_Ancient_Philosophers_On_Why_Death_Is_No_Evil
Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "LOVE AND DEATH IN THE STONE AGE"
1:14:02

Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "LOVE AND DEATH IN THE STONE AGE"

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:14:02
  • Updated: 23 Oct 2015
  • views: 838
videos
When we die, we live on as a persistent presence in the minds and memories of our loved ones.  Loved ones left behind have many ways of maintaining connections with their deceased, most notably marked burials in quiet places where the living are likely to return and visit.  Humans are the only kind of animal that buries their deceased loved ones and, as it happens, this gesture is preserved in some ancient archaeological sites. The emergence of burial traditions in the Stone Age implies that certain pre-modern humans (the Neanderthals) had already begun to care for the person as a unique, irreplaceable individual. In this lecture, Professor Stiner explores the origins of this essential human development, which likely represents the first cognitive bridge between the living and the deceased in human evolution
https://wn.com/Downtown_Immortality_Lecture_Series_Love_And_Death_In_The_Stone_Age
Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "THE ELUSIVE SELF IN LIFE AND DEATH"
57:45

Downtown Immortality Lecture Series: "THE ELUSIVE SELF IN LIFE AND DEATH"

  • Order:
  • Duration: 57:45
  • Updated: 12 Nov 2015
  • views: 468
videos
Professor Shaun Nichols and his research team spent months exploring attitudes towards death among Hindus and Tibetan Buddhists in India. His exploration was prompted by the philosophical argument that we should not fear the idea of death because there is no enduring self that remains exactly the same even during biological life. At most we (our selves) are a collection of values, convictions, and memories undergoing constant change. From this perspective, the future “you" who dies will not be the same person as “you" today. Because Tibetan Buddhists embrace the concept that there is no enduring self throughout biological life, they should be less afraid of death at the end of biological life. But are they? His findings may surprise you.
https://wn.com/Downtown_Immortality_Lecture_Series_The_Elusive_Self_In_Life_And_Death
Downtown Lecture: Scott Anderson, November 4, 2015
49:22

Downtown Lecture: Scott Anderson, November 4, 2015

  • Order:
  • Duration: 49:22
  • Updated: 13 Nov 2015
  • views: 63
videos
The Art All Around Us: Illustration and Visual Culture in AmericaScott Anderson, associate professor of art at Westmont, reveals the collective impact of illustration on our culture.
https://wn.com/Downtown_Lecture_Scott_Anderson,_November_4,_2015
Yakima River Canyon: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
49:07

Yakima River Canyon: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 49:07
  • Updated: 30 Sep 2013
  • views: 10984
videos
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Yakima River Canyon". Topics include river meander development, formation of the Yakima River Canyon, and the 1998 debris flows in the canyon. Record on May 29, 2013 at Ellensburg City Library's Hal Holmes Center in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 241 folks attended the lecture.
https://wn.com/Yakima_River_Canyon_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Downtown Lecture Series preview
1:07

Downtown Lecture Series preview

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:07
  • Updated: 07 Oct 2015
  • views: 140
videos
J. Edward Wright will speak about "The Histories and Mysteries of Heaven" in the first lecture of the series on immortality. Video courtesy of the University of Arizona College of Behavioral Sciences.
https://wn.com/Downtown_Lecture_Series_Preview
Downtown Lecture Series: The Histories and Mysteries of Heaven
1:05:44

Downtown Lecture Series: The Histories and Mysteries of Heaven

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:05:44
  • Updated: 16 Oct 2015
  • views: 866
videos
Many people imagine heaven as a spectacularly beautiful place somewhere “up there” where God resides and where loved ones are finally and eternally united. How did the hope for a blessed afterlife arise and evolve in Western religions? Why did the hope for a heavenly afterlife become so powerful? And what do our images of the afterlife reveal about our deepest fears and highest hopes as humans today? In this lecture, Professor Wright will address these and other questions related to the power of afterlife beliefs and images of heaven. He will also explore possibilities for future images of the afterlife in light of recent advances in technology and modern science.
https://wn.com/Downtown_Lecture_Series_The_Histories_And_Mysteries_Of_Heaven
Downtown Immorality Lecture Series: "THE DARK IMMORTALITY OF THE VAMPIRE"
1:26:20

Downtown Immorality Lecture Series: "THE DARK IMMORTALITY OF THE VAMPIRE"

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:26:20
  • Updated: 29 Oct 2015
  • views: 786
videos
In time for Halloween, Professor Hogle will explore the surprising evolution of the vampire as an immortal being and why it has has become increasingly popular as both a desirable and an ominous figure.  For centuries, the mythic figure of the vampire embodied an evil immortality, bent on sucking life-blood from the living. Incorporated into 19th century Gothic fiction, this figure became symbolic of social and psychological evils, such as (sadly) the threat to "white purity" from the blood of other races, the depravity of the old-world aristocracy (as in Count Dracula), or the feared aggressiveness and greater independence of "liberated" women. But towards the end of the 20th century, the vampire-figure started to become "good" in some fictions and films. What does this recent change say about our modern social and cultural values?
https://wn.com/Downtown_Immorality_Lecture_Series_The_Dark_Immortality_Of_The_Vampire
Wenatchee Ice Age Floods: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
1:58:02

Wenatchee Ice Age Floods: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:58:02
  • Updated: 24 Mar 2018
  • views: 6
videos
CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Wenatchee: Ice Age Floods. Topics include the bedrock of the Wenatchee area, and evidence for Ice Age floodwater that crept up the Wenatchee River Valley. CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Floods of Lava and Water. Topics include the Washingtons Columbia River Basalts (Lava) and Ice Age Floods (Water). CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Wenatchee. Nick Zentner, geologist at Central Washington University, describes the connection between the Ice Age Floods and agriculture (e.g. soil types and structure) as we know it today in eastern.
https://wn.com/Wenatchee_Ice_Age_Floods_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Discover SWUFE 2013, day 5 - lecture, Chengdu, cooking lesson, downtown
8:26

Discover SWUFE 2013, day 5 - lecture, Chengdu, cooking lesson, downtown

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:26
  • Updated: 23 Jul 2013
  • views: 183
videos
video 07
https://wn.com/Discover_Swufe_2013,_Day_5_Lecture,_Chengdu,_Cooking_Lesson,_Downtown
Downtown Lecture Series: Edible Roman Empire
1:29:03

Downtown Lecture Series: Edible Roman Empire

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:29:03
  • Updated: 06 Nov 2014
  • views: 859
videos
What lessons can we learn about food and foodways from the Roman Empire? A surprising amount. The Roman Empire encompassed some 50-60 million people, transforming the lives of its conquered populations. Wheat, olive oil, wine, and fish paste were mass-produced and transported thousands of miles, undercutting local food traditions. Agribusiness and monoculture supplanted independent farmers. Crops were harvested unsustainably. But at the same time many people benefited from greater food security than ever before. Who were the winners and losers in this, the first globalized food system?
https://wn.com/Downtown_Lecture_Series_Edible_Roman_Empire
Mount Rainier: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
1:38:54

Mount Rainier: Downtown Geology Lecture Series

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:38:54
  • Updated: 21 Aug 2017
  • views: 58
videos
Part of the Geology Lecture Series presented on March 5, 2011. Dr. Carolyn L. Driedger Hydrologist/Outreach Coordinator United States Geology Survey, . CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Mount Rainier Geology. Topics include the Washingtons plate tectonic history, Cascade Range history, and a current . View more from our digital library: Like us on Facebook: Follow us on Twitter: . CWU Geologys Nick Zentner presents Tsunami In Our Future. Topics include Brian Atwaters coastal evidence for the January 26, 1700 great earthquake and .
https://wn.com/Mount_Rainier_Downtown_Geology_Lecture_Series
Downtown Lecture Series: Rachana Kamtekar
0:35

Downtown Lecture Series: Rachana Kamtekar

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:35
  • Updated: 02 Nov 2015
  • views: 258
videos
Rachana Kamtekar, Associate Professor of Philosophy, talks about leaving a legacy. She will speak about "Two Ancient Philosophers on Why Death is No Evil" at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4, as part of the Downtown Lecture Series on immortality. Video courtesy of the College of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arizona.
https://wn.com/Downtown_Lecture_Series_Rachana_Kamtekar
Westmont Downtown Lecture: Jane Wilson
46:10

Westmont Downtown Lecture: Jane Wilson

  • Order:
  • Duration: 46:10
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2018
  • views: 12
videos
Flourishing as Human Beings: The Impact of Practicing Gratitude Jane Wilson, Associate Professor of Education February 22, 2018, 5:30 p.m. University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara St. Even though gratitude is a central pillar of most religions and has been discussed in fields of sociology, ethics, and philosophy for centuries, only recently has it been scientifically studied. A growing body of social science research reveals that gratitude has the power to heal, energize and transform lives. People who consistently engage in practicing gratitude experience a boost in their overall well-being. Daily expressions of gratitude can enhance a person psychologically, socially, spiritually, physically and cognitively. Professor Wilson will summarize the research and identify key practices of gratitude that help people flourish as human beings.
https://wn.com/Westmont_Downtown_Lecture_Jane_Wilson
Westmont Downtown Lecture:  Martin Asher
1:05:04

Westmont Downtown Lecture: Martin Asher

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:05:04
  • Updated: 18 Oct 2017
  • views: 85
videos
What Will the Fed Do Next? What’s Ahead for the U.S. Economy Martin Asher, Professor of Economics and Business October 12, 2017, 5:30 p.m. University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara St. We are living in historic times. By public measures, the economy is fully employed, and inflation and interest rates remain rela-tively low. What interplay will occur between fiscal policy and monetary policy in 2017 and beyond? Though Congress has yet to formulate its plans on many critical issues, considerable discussion has occurred there and from the administration regarding fiscal policy proposals in the areas of business tax cuts, personal tax cuts and spending on infrastructure. Depending on what is ultimately enacted, how might the Federal Reserve respond? What will likely happen to the macroeconomy, that is, to production, unemployment, inflation and interest rates?
https://wn.com/Westmont_Downtown_Lecture_Martin_Asher
Downtown Lecture: Andrea Gurney, October 8, 2015
45:32

Downtown Lecture: Andrea Gurney, October 8, 2015

  • Order:
  • Duration: 45:32
  • Updated: 15 Oct 2015
  • views: 166
videos
"Wired for Love: The Importance of Early Attachment" Are early relational experiences really that important to the development of a person? Do the bonds we form in childhood make a difference in later intimate relationships such as our marriages? Beginning with animal studies conducted in the 1950s, Gurney presents classic and revolutionary research in the field of attachment and child development and discuss the development of children’s Internal Working Model (IWM). As a practicing clinical psychologist, Gurney will discusses the four different attachment styles and the ways they affect relationships in childhood and adulthood. She also considers the impact of parenting practices on the emotional world of children.
https://wn.com/Downtown_Lecture_Andrea_Gurney,_October_8,_2015